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Courses Taught by Graham Center Faculty

(Spring 2021)

IDS 4930 | Middle East Political Economy
Tuesdays – Periods 5-6 (11:45 am – 1:40 pm)
Thursday – Period 6 (12:50-1:40 pm)
Instructor: Dr. Hania Abou Al-Shamat
| Syllabus

This course introduces students to the different historical, institutional and social factors and issues that have shaped the current economic and political climate in the Middle East and North Africa region since the early 20th century. It covers the economic legacies of the colonial era, the state-led structural transformations of the national economies, and the region’s integration into the world market. Some of the topics covered are human capital, labor markets, oil economies, migration, social inequality, subsidies, rent-seeking, water and food security, and the military economy. Upon successful completion of the course, students will have gained a strong background and analytical understanding of the diverse economic structures and political systems of the region, and the most pressing economic and political issues it faces.

INS 4930 | Senior Research Seminar
Mondays – Periods 8-10 (3-6pm)
Instructor: Dr. Hania Abou Al-Shamat
| Syllabus

This seminar is for seniors in the International Studies major to learn the basics of research in the field, conduct research on a topic and region of their choice, and write an original research paper. Students will also learn and analyze major current issues and themes in international relations and various research methodologies.

IDS 4930 | Urbanizing Asia
MWF Period 6
Instructor: Dr. Tim Karis
| Syllabus

Cities across Asia are booming, attracting increased academic interest as the transformations to urban economies, built environments, and cultural orientations call for fresh analysis. This class uses interdisciplinary and comparative perspectives to explore the drivers and impacts of urbanization in Asia, focusing on the interactions between wider structural forces (urban planning and design practices, global capitalism, city and state policies) and the experiences of people themselves navigating life in the city. Topics covered include the relationships between modernism and urbanism, patterns of migration to Asian cities, suburbanization and residential segregation, informal labor, rights to urban space, and the effects of globalization on urban economies. The class employs case studies from Hong Kong, Singapore, Mumbai, Hanoi, Bangkok, Tokyo, Manila, and other Asian cities.

IDS 4930 | Human Rights in Asia
MWF Period 7
Instructor: Dr. Tim Karis
| Syllabus

This class critically investigates and applies the framework of human rights with reference to Asian countries and cultures, analyzing the tensions related to the application of universalist ideals onto culturally diverse localities. We will begin with the origins of different national and global standards of human rights, including perspectives from relevant Asian belief systems. Next, we look to Asia’s 20th century history of political violence, identifying how basic rights can become eroded and how societies continue to memorialize past atrocities and seek justice and accountability. Finally, we will examine the contemporary experiences of ethnic minorities in Asia facing legal obstacles and persecution, both at home and as workers abroad. The class draws upon case studies from Cambodia, China, Taiwan, Myanmar, Thailand, Indonesia, Jordan, and elsewhere.

INS 4930 | Senior Research Seminar in International Studies
Tuesdays 3-6 pm
Instructor: Dr. Tim Karis
| Syllabus

This course offers seniors in the International Studies major the opportunity to examine current debates and theoretical innovations in the field, conduct guided research on a topic and region of their choice, and write an original research paper. Each week, our readings and discussions will address both 1) research and writing strategies to guide your project, and 2) issues and concepts of contemporary relevance to international studies scholars, including debates about globalization, citizenship and rights, the environment and social justice, political-economic change, migration and refugees, urbanization, power and resistance, humanitarianism, and global governance. We will use the readings not only to extract insight and information, but also to serve as models for the presentation of research findings. We will cover most regions of the world and draw on scholarship from a variety of disciplines in the social sciences.

IDS 4930 | Florida Legislative Politics
Online
Instructor: Roger Austin | Syllabus

Experiencing a session of the Florida legislature is a unique experience. Each session is full of drama, conflicting political priorities, differing visions of the future of the state and last minute strategies to get legislation passed. State agencies, the Courts and local government are significantly affected by the decisions made by the legislature, but the impact often differs depending on a variety of factors. The Supreme Court not only has several major cases pending that will affect public policies, but will also have two new justices who could dramatically change the work of the court. Florida is a relatively young state but has rapidly grown into the third largest and most diverse state in the nation; try to conceive of gaining almost 1000 people per day every day for 60 years and growing from under 2 million citizens to over 21 million! The implications for governing are staggering. Since it is not a state with a clear social or political identity, regional differences play a significant role in policy development at all levels of government. The rapidly changing demographics also affect political priorities as do policies in Washington, DC. This class has two priorities:

  • Examine the ways in which the past may have affected legislative decisions during this session; and
  • Evaluate the impact these decisions will have in the future on local governments in the state.

INS 3004 | International Studies Perspectives
Tuesdays Periods 5-6 (11:45 – 1:40 pm)
Thursdays Period 5 (11:45-12:35) or Period 6 (12:50-1:40)
Instructor: Dr. Matt Jacobs
| Syllabus

This is the required entry course for the major in International Studies. It will introduce you to the contemporary international system, the major regions of the world, to the academic disciplines that make up the field of International Studies, and to several major issues in world politics today.

(Fall 2020)

IDS 2338 | Democratic Engagement and Public Leadership (General Education, Social Science)
Online
Instructor: Marianne Vernetson
| Syllabus

Being a citizen implies a certain set of individual responsibilities that are essential to keep a democracy healthy and functioning. Fulfilling one’s role as a citizen requires engaged and informed participation. This course provides the tools and skills needed to be an effective citizen and offers opportunities for engagement and experiential learning. From the founding documents to the role of the press in politics, this course provides an understanding of how the past informs current political debate.

INS 3004 | International Studies Perspectives
M/W – Period 7 (1:55-2:45)
Fridays – Periods 6 & 7 (12:45-1:55 and 1:55-2:45)
Instructor: Dr. Tim Karis
| Syllabus

This course provides majors in International Studies with a comprehensive
introduction to the field. Readings and discussions will cover all regions of the world and engage with contemporary global problems through an interdisciplinary lens that draws from political science, anthropology, economics, sociology, environmental studies, and geography. Topics include globalization, political and economic change, poverty and development, migration and refugees, nationalism, human-environment interactions, human rights, and religion.

INS 4930 | Senior Research Seminar in International Studies
Mondays (periods 8-10)
Instructor: Hania Abou al-Shamat | Syllabus

Tuesdays (periods 8-10)
Instructor: Dr. Tim Karis | Syllabus

Fridays (periods 5-7)
Instructor: Alex Panayotov | Syllabus

This seminar offers advanced students in the International Studies major the opportunity to examine current debates and theoretical innovations in the field, conduct guided research on a topic and region of their choice, and write an original research paper.

WOH3241 | The Vietnam War
T/TH (11:45-1:40pm)
Instructor: Dr. Matt Jacobs | Syllabus

Nearly half a century after the conclusion of its U.S. phase, the Vietnam War remains one of the most contested and debated moments in modern American history.  Students will learn about the conflict from a variety of perspectives, American and Vietnamese, and develop an analytical foundation for considering the two wars—Afghanistan and Iraq—that have dominated international politics and U.S. political culture in modern times.